Events in Atlanta & Memphis Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Hello World,

To be clear, today April 4, 2018, is not a day that we celebrate the assassination of likely the greatest civil rights leader to have ever lived 50 years ago before he was shot to death on April 4, 1968. We are commemorating Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and times not the tragedy of the death of a 39-year-old man who accomplished more than many who lived two of his lifetimes…

If you are in Atlanta, Georgia, his birthplace or Memphis, Tennessee, where he was assassinated, you have many opportunities to commemorate his life and times. Below are just a sampling of these events:

From The King Center’s website mlk50forward.org:

  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace Prize Award Ceremony on April 4, 2018, Ceremony: 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., Luncheon: 12 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Nonviolent Peace Prize is The King Center’s highest award presented for commitment to nonviolence as a way of life through which social justice, human rights and civil liberties are attained for all. The prize also recognizes achievements in the eradication of poverty and racism, and the successful quest for alternatives to war. Honoring Benjamin Ferencz and Bryan Stevenson. To register and for more information, go to eventbrite.com. 
  • Global Bell Ringing & Wreath Laying on April 4, 2018 at 6:01 p.m. CST. The Global Bell Ringing will begin at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, TN and The King Center in conjunction with the rest of the world.
    The Wreath Laying, which will include the King Family, will take place at the crypt of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King in Atlanta, Georgia.
  • King Centennials Speaks on April 7, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The Centennial Generation of “King Children”, Miss Yolanda Renee King, Granddaughter of Martin Luther King Jr. and Miss Maryn Rippy, Granddaughter of AD King, will host an event highlighting youth all over the world doing innovative and extraordinary work for humanity. The program
    will be co-emceed by Hudson Yang, Eddie from ABC’s “Fresh off the Boat” and  Storm Reid, Meg from the movie “A Wrinkle in Time.” Admission is free, but you must register at eventbrite.com. 
  • March for Humanity & Love for Humanity Tribute on April 9, 2018. The march will be 12:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., and the Morehouse Event will be 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. The March in Atlanta will begin in front of Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church and end at the campus of Morehouse College followed by a Love for Humanity Tribute. Registration is required.

From the National Civil Rights Museum’s website mlk50.civilrightsmuseum.org:

  • 10:00 AM Daylong Tributes from the MLK50 Main Stage in the Museum Courtyard on April 4 – Musical, dance and spoken word performances and reflections from civil rights leaders in salute to Dr. King. Free to the public.
  • 3:30 PM The 6:01 50th Anniversary Ceremony from the Balcony of the Lorraine Motel on April 4– The Beloved Community will gather for the official ceremony with the laying of the wreath, ecumenical liturgy, musical and spoken word tributes, and remarks from civil rights icons. Free to the public.
  • 6:01 PM Bell Toll on April 4 – Bells ring at places of worship, college campuses or institutions 39 times across the nation to honor the number of years Dr. King dwelled on this earth and to pay homage to his legacy.
  • 6:15 PM Evening of Storytelling – Civil Rights Icons and New Movement Makers in dialogue about “the Movement” then and now. This is a ticketed event at Crosstown Concourse in Memphis. The event will address the MLK50 theme, Where Do We Go From Here? Michael Eric Dyson and April Ryan will co-moderate a session with a set of candid discussions on the political, legal, and cultural aspects of social justice activism.  Former MSNBC anchor Tamron Hall will host a session with CongressmanJohn Lewis and James Lawson.  Invited speakers will share their recollections from the front lines, analysis of modern strategies, and ideas for new techniques that modern activists can use to further Dr. King’s platforms for peace, justice and equity.  Confirmed guests include seasoned civil rights icons Jesse Jackson,Marian Wright Edelman, Diane Nash, Clarence Jones, Bill Lucy,Coby Smith, Mike Cody, and Elaine Turner along with newcomers Yadon Israel, Bree Newsome, Quentin James, Nicole Porter, Tamika Mallory, Alicia Garza, and Tami Sawyer.  Apparently, this event is sold out, but you never know if someone will not show up and you can get in 🙂 For more information, go to mlk50.civilrightsmuseum.org.

Also, through Civil Rights Tours Atlanta, on Saturday, April 7, you can retrace the funeral route of Dr. King. See the places 50 years ago that served as key points in his funeral. They will also be observing the third anniversary of Civil Rights Tours Atlanta — showing you how incredibly things have changed. Reserve your seat @ www.civilrightstour.com and use the promo code “Civil” for a 20% discount!

And if you don’t live in Atlanta or Memphis, below is a link to an interview with journalist Alexis Scott.

From WABE.org:

Her grandfather founded “The Atlanta Daily World,” the nation’s oldest daily African-American newspaper. Scott became the paper’s publisher for 17 years and is currently a political commentator for “The Georgia Gang.” For WABE’s ongoing ATL68 series, Alexis Scott joined Lois Reitzes on “City Lights” to discuss her impressions of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 50 years after his assassination.

How are you commemorating the life and times of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Any thoughts?

 

How Martin Luther King Jr.’s Last Sunday Sermon Speaks to Us Today – A Post from the Denison Forum…

Me and Dr. Bernice King, CEO of The King Center, at the Atlanta Tribune: The Magazine Women of Excellence reception last night…

Hello World,

I had planned to post about the fact that the 33rd Stellar Gospel Music Awards will be aired tonight on Good Friday no less on TV One at 9 p.m. EST and 8 p.m. CST and share some fun red carpet photos from the event which took place last Saturday, but then I received an inspiring post in my inbox from the Denison Forum  this morning which is the website where Dr. Jim Denison writes about cultural and contemporary issues from a Christian perspective.

His post was so inspiring and timely that I thought I would share a portion of it here particularly since I got the chance to hear Dr. Bernice King speak at the Atlanta Tribune: The Magazine Woman of Excellence Reception last night. I interviewed her in 2014 for the magazine so I got to know her a little bit back then, but last night she reminded everyone of something: When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., her father, became a martyr on April 4, 1968, 50 years ago next week, he was one of the most hated men in America. It was only because of the diligent work of his wife Coretta Scott King AFTER his death that he became a man loved the whole world over. Her statement spoke to me on so many levels. When we’re doing what is right in the eyes of the Lord we may not be liked, loved nor appreciated. In fact, we may not even live to see the fruits of our sacrificial labor. I’m reminded that when Jesus died he was treated as a common criminal, spat on, mocked and physically abused. So it is up to us to demonstrate that his actions in laying down his life were the ultimate in sacrificial love and that this gift of love is high, deep and wide enough to save whole world if only we share this Good News…

Below is a portion of Dr. Denison’s post:

Tomorrow marks the fiftieth anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s last Sunday sermon.

On March 31, 1968, Dr. King preached at the Washington National Cathedral. An overflow crowd heard him deliver “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” calling his listeners to join God in a movement that would bring righteousness to a culture divided by racial bigotry and endemic poverty.

In his message, he noted: “On some positions, cowardice asks the question: Is it expedient? And then expedience comes along and asks the question: Is it politic? Vanity asks the question: Is it popular? Conscience asks the question: Is it right?”

Then Dr. King stated, “There comes a time when one must take the position that is neither safe nor politic nor popular, but he must do it because conscience tells him it is right.”

Four days later, he paid for his conscience with his life.

Dr. King ended his sermon by invoking a hymn sung earlier in the service as a challenge to America, the church, and all of humanity:

Once to ev’ry man and nation
Comes the moment to decide,
In the strife of truth and falsehood,
For the good or evil side;
Some great cause, some great decision,
Off’ring each the bloom or blight,
And the choice goes by forever
‘Twixt that darkness and that light.

“God proved his love on the cross”

On this Good Friday, we remember Jesus’ choice “‘twixt that darkness and that light,” his “great decision” to bear the evil of our sin for the “great cause” of our salvation.

You and I have no ability to fathom just what this day cost our Savior.

See the rest at denisonforum.org.

I will share one snippet from the Stellar Awards. Below is a video snippet of Tori Kelly & The Hamiltones, the R&B trio made up of the three singers who sing background for Anthony Hamilton, performing “Help Us To Love,” which is appropros on this Good Friday.

Here is a excerpt of the lyrics written by Kirk Franklin:

This world is weeping, hurting, broken and begging for change
Oh yeah
But still we marching, praying, dying, and things stay the same
When will we see?
Till everyone’s free
There’ll never be peace between you and me
God, your love is the cure
For the rich and the poor
God, please will you open our eyes?

Any thoughts?

The Top 10 Blog Posts and or Articles for Black Christian Women in February 2018

Hello World,

I’m back with my monthly roundup of blog posts and or articles for black Christian women! So below is my Top 10 monthly roundup of blog posts and or magazine/newspaper articles for black Christian women for February ( but you don’t have be a black Christian woman to to check them out 🙂  As usual, let me know if you like my list! Enjoy and share!

1. “See the Newly Unveiled Official Portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama” by Mary Rhodan

Excerpt: The National Portrait Gallery unveiled the long-awaited portraits of former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama on Monday. The Obamas’ portraits were painted by New York based artist Kehinde Wiley and Baltimore-based artist Amy Sherald. They are the first African Americans commissioned to paint official portraits of the first couple for the National Portrait Gallery. The two artists’ works will be on display at the National Portrait Gallery starting on February 13. Aside from the White House, the Gallery is home to the only complete collection of presidential portraits; according to the Smithsonian, it is comprised of more than 1,600 works. See more at: time.com.

2. “Rosa Parks Was My Aunt. Here’s What You Don’t Know About Her” by Urana McCauley

Excerpt: Sometimes I struggle with social media because it seems there’s always somebody belittling Auntie Rosa. I recently saw someone post that my aunt wasn’t really black. Or people say that she was strategically placed on the bus in Montgomery because she was lighter skinned. It’s amazing to me that they would think that. Yes our family ancestry is part African American, part white, and part Native American. Auntie Rosa considered herself black and was treated as black. We have a lot of work to do in this country regarding colorism, but whether you’re light or dark — and this is still true today — you are black in America and you’re going to be treated accordingly. See more at: shondaland.com.

3. “‘Black Panther’ brings unexpected boost to makers of African inspired clothing” by Nedra Rhone and Shelia M. Poole

Excerpt: In Wakanda, the fictional African country from which Black Panther hails, the prints, colors and cuts of African clothing are woven throughout whether in an action scene, a street scene or a backdrop to other significant moments. Atlantan Carl Ulysses Bowen was one of tailors on the “Black Panther” film. Ulysses , who owns a tailoring and custom clothing business in Buckhead, said he added some of his own touches to the clothes designed by Ruth Carter. “I drew my inspiration from African culture and different African tribes within that culture,” said Bowen, who graduated from Morehouse College in 2005. He perused videos and looked at African history and photography books. He also scoured the internet. See more at: myajc.com.

4. “Ayesha Curry Is Pregnant, Expecting Third Child With Stephen Curry” by Emily Longeretta

Excerpt: The couple are already the proud parents to daughters Riley, 6, and Ryan, 3. The CoverGirl spokesperson met Curry, 29, when they were 14 and 15, attending the same church youth group. The went on to marry in 2011. See more at: usmagazine.com.

5. “Stephanie Paul stays true to Haitian heritage” by Yash Bhika

Excerpt:  In Bayshore Drive in Naples, Florida, lies the Naples New Haitian Church of the Nazarene. The church is owned by Paul’s dad, Renauld. This is where she spent a good portion of her childhood. Paul would learn how to sing gospel songs, which she still sings to this day. Just as she was able to express herself inside her church, she also had the love and support of her family. It is in Naples where she grew up as the youngest of nine siblings. Her siblings are Lo, John, Jean, Matt, Josie, Nephtalie, Da-anna, Eunice and Dann. There is a 25-year age gap from Paul’s oldest sibling, Lo, to her. All of her siblings participated in sports either at the collegiate or the high school level. They all played basketball and Paul was able to learn from them. Despite such a large discrepancy in ages between the children, the love for each other was always there. See more at: redandblack.com.

6. “‘We Mean Business or No Washing’: The Atlanta Washerwomen Strike of 1881” by Brandon Weber

Excerpt: In the 1880s, twenty years after the “official” end of slavery in the United States, African Americans continued to suffer extreme oppression and violence. Lynchings were common and “separate but equal” Jim Crow laws gave African Americans minimal access to schools, the military, and labor unions—the kinds of institutions that helped other Americans move toward prosperity. It was in this context that a group of African American washerwomen in Atlanta organized themselves to demand better wages and working conditions. “The Washing Society,” as they called themselves, struck in the summer of 1881, taking on the business and political establishment of Atlanta, Georgia. The action served to remind the city’s white majority whom they depended on for the clothes they wore. The strike—a group of black women organizing against omnipresent discrimination to demand recognition and respect for their work—stands out in union history as a most unlikely success. See more at: progressive.org.

7. “Lillian Thomas Fox was a journalist and champion for her race” by Dawn Mitchell 

Excerpt: History refers to Lillian Thomas Fox as a journalist and club woman, which seems to be a slight on a woman so far ahead of her time. As a black woman at the end of the 19th century, she became a champion for public health for the Indianapolis black community.Fox was born in 1854 in Chicago to Rev. Byrd Parker, an AME minister, and Janet J. Johnson, a schoolteacher. Fox’s father died in 1860, and her mother married Robert E. Thomas. The family moved to Wisconsin. Lillian took his last name. See more at: indystar.com.

8. “4 ways that black Catholic sisters rewrote the American story” by Diane Batts Morrow

Excerpt: As we observe Black History Month in 2018, examining the early history of the Oblate Sisters of Providence can teach us several important lessons. The sisters proved exceptional in 19th-century America: They were black and free in a slave society that privileged only whiteness; female in a male dominated society; Roman Catholic in a Protestant society; and pursuing religious vocations in a society doubting the virtue of all black women. Organized in Baltimore in 1828, this pioneering black sisterhood dedicated themselves to educating black girls. The Oblate Sisters confronted many challenges in their early years. Most white people did not believe that black people could lead virtuous lives and rejected as impossible the idea of a black Catholic sisterhood. See more at: catholicphilly.com.

9. “Doing a New Thing – A 21st Century Vision for AME HBCUs” by Tiffany Brockington

Excerpt: Arguably, the two most important black spaces in America are HBCUs and the Black Church.  The importance and connection of both is outlined in the new documentary, “Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Historically Black Colleges and Universities.”  The title of this documentary is attributed Richard Wright Sr., and serves as a directive which influenced not just the arc of the film, but several historically black campuses.  See more at: hbcudigest.com.

10. “A Harlem Woman With A Wardrobe Worthy Of A Deeper Look” by Channing Hargrove

Excerpt: On Friday, Turner’s wardrobe went on display once again, this time at the Projects+ Gallery in Saint Louis, Missouri. Open now through March 31, the exhibit features a series of black and white photographs of Turner’s pieces by Dario Calmese, which explore the role of Black churches “as activators not only for imagination but as crucibles for the construction of self” within the African American community. Calmese, whose father was a pastor, has a personal connection to to Turner’s story. “Growing up in the church, the ritual of getting dressed for Sunday morning is a heavy thread in the fabric of my childhood memories,”he told Vogue. Through the photos, it’s evident that Turner has a similar collection with clothing. See more at: refinery29.com.

If you know of any black Christian women bloggers and or writers, please e-mail me at jacqueline@afterthealtarcall.com as I’m always interested in expanding my community of black Christian women blogs and websites. As I noted before, while this is a roundup of interesting blog posts and or magazine and newspaper articles for black Christian women, you don’t have to be one to appreciate these pieces  🙂.

Any thoughts?